SOMEBODY - MIU MIU - WOMEN’S TALES #8

Falling at the hand of a perfect man

And I said all I’ve got is a bunch of sad stories and I told them all before the night was through and we cried. 

mcnallyjackson:

JUST LEAKED: a photo still from the upcoming film adaptation of Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

All hail the 50 states. I would’ve failed art in second grade. All hail the 50 states. I would’ve failed art in second grade. All hail the 50 states. I would’ve failed art in second grade. All hail the 50 states. I would’ve failed art in second grade. All hail the 50 states. I would’ve failed art in second grade. All hail the 50 states. I would’ve failed art in second grade. All hail the 50 states. I would’ve failed art in second grade.

All hail the 50 states. I would’ve failed art in second grade.

(via everythingyoulovetohate)

wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More wetheurban:


ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art
Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 
Read More

wetheurban:

ART: Hip Hop x High Art = Fly Art

Fly Art, a Tumblr account created by students Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano has been perfectly mixing popular rap lyrics and Renaissance paintings since December 2013 and we only can hope that they never stop. 

Read More

Q

hiddenottercrouchingmango asked:

Do you ever write fan fiction?

A

neil-gaiman:

Sure. There are at least two Sherlock Holmes stories, two episodes of Doctor Who, and “Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?” that I’d count as fan fiction… Although I’m not sure if it still counts when they pay you for it.

skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.
skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

(via notebooknumberfour)